Tuesday, May 10, 2011

Brothers having fun (OR: yep, I'm a parent)

Here's a little bit of fun two brothers share:


...but at the same time, I'm wondering whether all parents have the same thought that I had?

To wit: hope they put as much effort into learning a marketable skill!

20 comments:

Sir Aaron said...

Yeah, I had a similar thought, which is unfair to the kids (maybe), and yet I had it. I was thinking, do either of these kids know how to add, subtract, multiply, and divide?

Tom Chantry said...

If the smaller one knows how to multiply and divide, he's doing pretty well!

Sir Aaron said...

He would be. And he'd probably do better than learning how to dance!

Brad Williams said...

I think that their dancing is better than mastering a Nintendo DS. If I had some cool rectangular glasses, I would wax eloquent about the beauty of dance as an art of self-expression.

Seriously, when you see a kid ride his bike well, or hit a baseball well, do you think, "Yeah, well I hope that kid can do some Math, or is studying carpentry or something useful like that!"

DJP said...

Bike riding? No. Something that takes hours and hours of focused effort and practice but produces nothing marketable? As a rule, yes.

Kevin Stilley said...

I am now feeling seriously guilty about the 2000 hours I have spent playing Empires: Total War.

Brad Williams said...

I said bike riding because dancing like they were dancing requires athletic skill, cardio-vascular endurance, and creativity. While not particularly marketable, these things can certainly be helpful and enjoyable. Surely not everything is valued in terms of whether or not we can make money doing it, right?

You're making me feel like all those years perfecting my paper football folding skills, and praticing paper football field goals, was all in vain.

DJP said...

Well yes, Kevin; but look how well that's worked out for you.

(c;

DJP said...

Biking is definitely marketable and useful for a kid, and for some adults.

But Brad, if you want to be the Voice of the Slacker here, I do think there's an opening.

(c;

Herding Grasshoppers said...

Okay... at least they're doing something together and physical/athletic. As opposed to overworking their opposable thumbs.

But yah, have to wonder if they put the same effort into helping out around the house or doing their school work.

Brad Williams said...

I'm in!

I just don't think dancing is in the slacker category. Bejeweled Blitz? Yes. Dancing, no. Paper football...

...

...

Probably.

Bill Honsberger said...

Why I learned to be a drummer?
Reason 1) Can't dance.
Reason 2) Thought chicks wouldn't see me even though I could see them.
Reason 3) Still couldn't dance.

DJP said...

Well, see, you thought it through responsible. So that's good.

Sir Aaron said...

@Brad:

I don't think you're wrong. Obviously, most of us (except Dan) who spend a lot of time on things that don't have any obvious or inherent future value. Some of those things are leisure activities.

However, you've got to wonder...if that kid can do that, what if he directed his talents towards something more useful?

DJP said...

Virtually every day of my life prior to 2/11/73 was spent doing nothing with a higher goal that my own immediate amusement. I deeply regret it.

Sir Aaron said...

(that was before I was born!)I know what you mean though, too well.

Brad Williams said...

@Sir Aaron

This sounds like a great beginning for a Hallmark movie, doesn't it?

Gruff Dad: Son, you need to make something of yourself. Quit this silly dancing business and learn a trade!

Young Teen: But dad! You just don't understand! I want to dance!

Gruff Dad: You quit that dance recital this instant, or you're outta the house!

Ending: Kid dancing at recital. Dad crying because he is so good and sees his son living his dream. Boy goes on to be a superstar interpretive dancer on TBN.

Sir Aaron said...

LOL.

Bill Honsberger said...

Worst yet - couldn't drum much better than I could dance!

Wendy said...

I dunno, I just thought it was great seeing two brothers (with such a big age difference) doing something together that actually required a lot of time to practice...together.

The older one could have taught the little one something a lot more damaging.