Thursday, December 20, 2012

Soliciting suggestions for streaming TV series

Howdy gang.

The missus and I are in the market for streaming TV shows to fill in the gaps preferably from Netflix streaming.

We loved the BBC's Sherlock and Foyle's War, but the former releases slowly and just a few eps, and the latter is ~90 min and we'll run out soon. We tried MI5, and lost interest about at the ep about the murderous pro-lifers.

"Life on Mars" has been recommended, but the short-lived US version is the only one on TV.

We've tried "Revolution" from live TV, and it was too stupidly-written for our brains to survive happily. We also tried "Touch" and, while we like Kiefer Sutherland, one can only take so much of him chasing an expressionless boy while shouting "Jake! Jake! Jaaaaaaaaake!"

We also tried NCIS, but when we found that the character DiNozzo wasn't euthanized and didn't grow in any way, and the Pauley Perrette character (unlike every non-burqa'd woman who ever lived) never changed her attire or character, we realized the writers were uncreative and lost interest.

So: any good mysteries? Sci-fi? Anything? What's good out there, and why?



58 comments:

Les Martin said...

I really like Breaking Bad. Their in their 5th season and about to wrap it up. The show does cross the line a bit with language and a few *ahem* immodest moments, but overall it keeps it to the story at hand rather than frivolous patty-cake (yeah, I'm looking at you Game of Thrones). It really digs into the character of a man and how far he can fall (or is really fallen) in the face of adversity. I think it's a good lesson on depravity. Even the good people want to do is pretty bad when left to themselves.

The Walking Dead is fun but their really just getting started and you'll be through the first 2 seasons pretty quickly with nothing else to see unless you can catch up on season 3 and watch them when they come back on in February.

Of course there's always Avengers:Earth's Mightiest Heroes with 2 seasons ready to go.

Les

Les Martin said...

Their there they're! Oh well... Not the worst thing I've ever done...

Cedric said...

It's a few years old but my wife and I really loved "Monk". If you aren't familiar with it, it's basically Sherlock Holmes with a twist: The reason he's such an observant detective is because he's highly OCD. For the most part it's a very family-friendly show with fun characters and a good mixture of humor and pathos. Some of the mysteries are very clever too.

Netflix also has quite a few oldies that I was either too young to appreciate when they were originally on the air, or were completely before my time. "The Rockford Files" holds up very well, and surprisingly so does the "Dick Van Dyke" show. For my money it's as good or better than any sitcom currently on TV, amazing since it's in B&W. I'm only 40 so I'm not saying that out of any sort of nostalgia. It's just very well-written.

I've also heard good things about "24", and other classics on Netflix such as "Alfred Hitchcock Presents", "Bonanza" and "Columbo", but I haven't had time to check them out.

Tom said...

How far into NCIS did you get, just out of curiosity? Because it gets better in the later seasons, although it doesn't help that Donald Bellisario is no Joss Whedon.

DJP said...

I forget. I think we did the whole first and started the second, and just were HATING the DiNozzo character, sure the writers would wake up and kill him off or "transfer" him or something... and then in England we saw an ep from like the eighth season, and there he was, just as idiotic and jerkish and junior-high-school as in the first season. And PP dressed exactly the same. Eight years later. Right. Because that's what women do.

Merrilee Stevenson said...

The Stevenson household also enjoyed nearly all of the Monk episodes, though we skipped a couple just based on their titles. Very cleverly (beautifully?) written in the final episode, I must say, and suitable for most audiences.

My husband and I are really enjoying Foyle's War, and also George Gently. Midsomer Murders have a number of passable mysteries (not nearly as well-written as Foyle's or Gently), and we've enjoyed a lot of Poirot as well.

My dad also recommended Doc Martin. I watched the first episode when he was here visiting, and thought it funny and somewhat intriguing. I'm hoping it might get better, but won't watch it further without my mate anyway, so who knows.

Mark said...

Lost really changed the landscape: every series now has a continuation tool to hook viewers. That said, I have quite the eclectic taste: from somewhat good stuff (I enjoy the odd scientific documentary), to poor (I enjoyed Xena, for instance). Here's what I have enjoyed:

Alphas
Arrow (over the top dramatic, super-hero fluff)
Babylon 5
Beauty & the Beast (CW fluff, like Arrow above)
Burn Notice
Castle
Elementary
Last Man Standing (sometimes poor comedy, adult issues)
Last Resort
Leverage (poor, but fun show)
The Mentalist (not conservative at all!)
Person of Interest (not too serialistic: show over in an hour)
Primeval: New World
Scandal (adult themes, non-christian values)
Suits (similar to Scandal)

Malcolm said...

Doctor Who. The new series, going into its eight season, is simply outstanding. Compelling story lines, great depth of characters, and links from the overall myth throughout - make for fun, memorable lines, and simply enjoyment.

Continuing in the BBC line, if you like cars - at all - Top Gear is an engaging, entertaining, and very funny show. Far, far, FAR! superior to the american version, or just about any other car show on the airwaves.

Both are on netflix instant watch with enough content to take you through to the summer of 2013 or beyond.

Malcolm said...

Doctor Who. The new series, going into its eight season, is simply outstanding. Compelling story lines, great depth of characters, and links from the overall myth throughout - make for fun, memorable lines, and simply enjoyment.

Continuing in the BBC line, if you like cars - at all - Top Gear is an engaging, entertaining, and very funny show. Far, far, FAR! superior to the american version, or just about any other car show on the airwaves.

Both are on netflix instant watch with enough content to take you through to the summer of 2013 or beyond.

Kevin Jackson said...

BBC actually has some really good shows. We love Merlin in our house. My wife and I have been watching Primeval, which is pretty decent if you can get past the evolutionary conceit behind it. We also just finished up a show called Survivors (not the reality show of (almost) the same name, and it was quite good.

On the American front, you can't go wrong with Eureka and Warehouse 13, both Sci-Fi (sorry, SyFy) Channel shows.

mikeb said...

We are extremely picky about our shows, as I'm in seminary and have no time to waste. Currently the fav (and only) show is the Mentalist. Very good show. Love the worldview clashes on that show.

Last summer the wife dragged me to watch Downtown Abbey. Most episodes are good, especially if you like historical shows. But sometimes it feels a bit like a soap.

DJP said...

Thanks.

Funny you like The Mentalist. We watched it once, and were vastly underwhelmed, to the point that the mere sight of the guy makes us yelp and grab for the control.

Webster Hunt (Parts Man) said...

Ever seen "Flashpoint"? My wife and I watch it on ION, but I think it streams on Netflix. At first my wife and I thought it was a little cheesy, but once you get to know the characters it's a great show to watch. The characters are members of a strategic response unit, and though some of the episodes tend to be a little overdramatic, the suspense and heroism of the characters makes it worth watching - so long as you can overlook them casting AmyJo Johnson of Power Rangers fame as the main love interest of one of the characters.

Steve Talas said...

I don't know if it's available in the States yet but the BBC have just screened a series called 'Hunted' a quite good espionage, thriller.

Some things don't travel well across the pond, and that goes for both ways. The kids love 'Merlin' and that is about to call it a day on Christmas Eve.

Silly Old Mom said...

I love Psych. The premise is that a detective's son, who was trained by his dad to be really observant, is fingered by the cops for a crime (because there's just no way he could have known so much about it unless he were the perp), and he gets out of it by telling the cops he's psychic. He ends up as a consultant for the police dept. and solves lots of crimes with the help of his childhood friend.

What reels me in is the dialogue -- tons of references to '80s pop culture -- and the fact that they bring on all kinds of '80s actors to do guest spots.

You have the usual worldly mentality towards sex and relationships ::eyeroll::, but overall they focus on the mysteries.

Bottom line -- if you like the sense of humor, you'll probably like the show.

A friend of mine said the later seasons of Monk weren't so good.

My husband's working his way through "MacGyver." If you're a Richard Dean Anderson fan, you might also want to try "Stargate: SG-1." "Stargate: Atlantis" was also pretty good, but "Stargate: Universe" was a very different series, and I didn't appreciate a lot of the character relationships.

LanternBright said...

Dan, have you tried Bones? It's a lot of fun for a police procedural--a good deal more enjoyable than I found, say, Law & Order or CSI (although I really liked both of those shows). The last 2-3 seasons have dipped *SLIGHTLY*, but mainly (from my perspective) because they began inserting embedded commercials within the dialogue of the show that got a little annoying. Otherwise, good times.

LanternBright said...

I'd also be remiss if I didn't tell you about BBC's The IT Crowd. With your background, I think you'll find it especially enjoyable. (Though it's a shame they've only got a few episodes available.)

Silly Old Mom said...

If you like '80s humor, you might like "Psych." The basic premise is that an extremely-observant detective's son passes himself off as a psychic so he can solve crimes, with his childhood friend as a sidekick.

There's the usual Hollywood mentality towards male-female relationships, but the emphasis is on the mysteries. I love the dialogue and the fact that they bring back all kinds of '80s actors for guest starring parts.

I've heard the later seasons of "Monk" aren't nearly as good as the earlier stuff.

My husband is working his way through "MacGyver." If you're a Richard Dean Anderson fan, you might want to try "Stargate: SG-1." "Stargate: Atlantis" is good too, but you'll probably want to avoid "Stargate: Universe."

Paula said...

DS's girlfriend suggested that I would like Downton Abbey, a BBC series that has become a surprise cult hit on both sides of the pond.She was right! It begins the day the Titanic went down and chronicles the lives of an aristocratic family in England as well as the parallel lives of their servants. There's romance, intrigue, back-stabbing, mystery, and the bloody carnage of WWI trench warfare. I LOVE the character development of the mysterious Mr. Bates, the valet. I couldn't turn it off because I wanted to see what happened to him.

There is one scene that almost made me stop watching - a homosexual kiss - early in Series One. I pressed on and there has been no repeat of it and other than one bedroom scene (that doesn't 'show' anything) the series' have been mostly chaste, in keeping with the times.

I watched it for free on Amazon Prime. Not sure if it's available other places. Season 3 has already been aired in GB and begins in January on PBS.

CleanFlea said...

Lie to Me is pretty good, but after a couple of seasons it starts to feel repetitive.

Star Trek TNG is always a winner.

And of course there is Myth Busters. How can you go wrong when the solution is more C4?

All are available on Netflix.

JackW said...

Mentalist is entertaining even if you don't like Simon Baker. The Kimbal Cho character makes it worth it alone.

trogdor said...

Psych. This may be a generational thing - it's most popular with the under-90 crowd due to the era of many of the pop culture references. But even if you're really old and don't get 3/4 of the jokes, it's sharp and witty enough to consistently be the most entertaining show on TV. And huge bonus points for repeatedly making fun of "The Mentalist" for ripping off their premise but forgeting to steal any of the humor, charm, or enjoyability.

Monk. A super-brilliant detective who also has numerous crippling neuroses. Features some of the most likeable main characters of any show ever (especially once Sharona left) and a surprisingly-high view of marriage through Monk's remembrance of his dead wife.

Burn Notice. The potential problem - it's set in Miami, so at times there's too much eye candy. On the plus side, the plot, suspense, and action are great (especially the first few seasons), it's funny enough when it needs to be, there's a lot of A-Team/McGyver type stuff, and Bruce Campbell is Bruce Campbell.

Dora the Explorer (as explained by my daughter). "I'm the map, I'm the map, I'm the map, I'm the map, I'm the map, I'm the map, I'm the map!" Also you can get pull-ups with Dora on them. Not as good as big-girl underwear, but not as bad as diapers. And the title rhymes if you're a Kennedy.

Star Trek: DS9. If only to remind you how good Babylon 5 was compared to Trek garbage.

Lost. Pretend season 6 didn't exist, and it might be one of the best series ever. Or, watch Alias, and remind yourself that JJ Abrams ruining a good premise by having no idea where to go from there didn't start on the island.

Fred Butler said...

How about that one comment up above recommending Dr. Who to you? I had to laugh.

Anyhow,

I have to agree with earlier commenters that Monk is a tremendous program. Even to this day, my wife and I tease each other over our "Monkish" habits. It had great lines that are repeatable.

AND, it is the one TV series that actually wrapped up real nice with a good strong episode that gave resolution to the main theme that ran through out the entirety of the show regarding Monk finding his wife's killer.

Along the same lines is Psych, which my wife started watching because Netflix recommended. She loves it.

5c6a3690-4ae4-11e2-8fdb-000bcdcb471e said...

We've just finished Season 8 "New Tricks" from BBC. Enjoyed them all with only a couple of exceptions. The series is about 3 retired old-school cops who return to the police force in the cold, unsolved cases unit. Det. Superintendent Pullman is saddled with them as a result of bungling a hostage situation. The series only gets better over the seasons as the characters are developed. Its been a favorite.

5c6a3690-4ae4-11e2-8fdb-000bcdcb471e said...

We've just finished Season 8 "New Tricks" from BBC. Its about 3 retired old-school cops who return to the police force to join the cold case squad headed by Det. Superintendent Pullman. The character development and series only gets better over the seasons.

Jeremiah Halstead said...

We really liked Numb3rs and Sherlock (BBC). Highly entertaining

mikivered said...

If you want to see good acting, good writing, and you like mysteries, then you must go to the British tv series. Morse and Frost are two very long running series that are available on Netflix. Lewis is the follow up to Morse and is excellent as well. A prequel to Morse came out last year called Endeavor that was very well received and they are planning a series with that younger version of Morse that should be coming out in the next few years. Recently, Murphy's Law has come out and it is quite good. Zen is also great and takes place in Rome. Wallander takes place in Sweden and the dark mood fits the place. Those are just a few of the really good British mysteries to get you started that are all available on Netflix. I'm sorry you gave up on MI-5 it was outstanding. Of course, Americans and Evangelical type Christians are politically incorrect in England so you can always spot the bad guys. Nevetheless, the writing and acting are first rate.

5c6a3690-4ae4-11e2-8fdb-000bcdcb471e said...

We've just finished Season 8 "New Tricks" from BBC. Its about 3 retired old-school cops who return to the police force to join the cold case squad headed by Det. Superintendent Pullman. The character development and series only gets better over the seasons.

DJP said...

Aw, "New Tricks" isn't on Netflix streaming.

)c:

trogdor said...

I should add Numb3rs. It's a solid show, and it's pretty fun dissecting the ridiculous maths they try to pass off. Even if you don't maths, it's pretty good.

Webster Hunt (Parts Man) said...

Try out "Journeyman" - a writer begins traveling backward and forward through time without control of doing so. It's a shame that it only lasted for 13 episodes, though. Also, if you want to see a neat miniseries, see if "The Lost Room" is on streaming - I haven't been able to find it yet. It's about a room that gets transported to an alternate dimension, and when people take items out of the room they possess properties to alter reality - like a key that opens any door and always ends up in the same room, a comb that stops time, and an egg timer that sublimates brass - and there's two groups of people trying to recollect the items. Now that was a cool show.

5c6a3690-4ae4-11e2-8fdb-000bcdcb471e said...

Try "Bluebloods." Its about the best in an American TV series - pretty pro-family for America not to mention actually showing a family saying "grace" before their Sunday dinners. Its an enjoyable cop drama set in NYC.

5c6a3690-4ae4-11e2-8fdb-000bcdcb471e said...

Try "Bluebloods." Its about the best in an American TV series - pretty pro-family for America not to mention actually showing a family saying "grace" before their Sunday dinners. Its an enjoyable cop drama set in NYC.

Leslie Wolf said...

Here are the shows that I've watched the last few years: BBC Poirot (on Netflix); West Wing (seasons 1-4); Monk; Psych; Planet Earth; Blue Planet; various National Geographic documentaries, including Yosemite, Denali, and Appalachian Trail (on Netflix); Ken Burns documentaries, including Baseball and Jazz; Frasier (seasons 1-4); House (early seasons); and, 30 Rock. There are a lot of good documentaries and movies on Netflix, which is my only means of watching anything (no TV).

Come to think of it, you might want to try Star Trek NG and DSN. Or X-Files. They're all on Netflix, I think.

Si Hollett said...

Jonathan Creek - a magician's trick inventor acts as a consultant for hire solving crimes that are bizarre. Not on Netflix US though (though on Youtube grey market)

Doc Martin (TV Movie, followed by TV show) is about Doctor (GP, not a hospital one) who moves to rural Cornish village from London. Comedic Drama with minor-medical-mystery-of-the-week in the British Sunday Pre-Watershed tradition: decent quality, but not too funny or too dramatic. House (only friendlier) crossed with Foyle's War in style. Inoffensive, reliable stuff and quite a bit of it.

Father Ted - comedy about Irish incompetent priests (mocking the characters and occasionally the Catholic church rather than Jesus/religion/etc if it was made in Hollywood). A bit rude (lots of 'Irish f-word', which got it past the censors to show at 9pm, not 10pm, but the DVDs got rated '15' due to the repeated use of this word: 10-per-25min episode or something, which would be TV-14 or something in America), but insanely funny.

Spaced - crammed full of SciFi/Comic references very funny sitcom about some young artsy types sharing a flat. A bit dated 10 years on, and well deserving of its 15 rating due to the swearing and crude talking.

If you look past the murderous pro-lifers episode and other similar stuff which would grind your political gears, then MI5 is good. Dare I say better than 24, though that's mostly due to plot density (no sleepwalking through middles of episodes).

Matt said...

"Rev" is about a Church of England priest in a run-down inner-city London parish. The character himself is pretty liberal, but his interactions with parishioners and his boss in the Anglican hierarchy are fun, and it has a good heart.

threegirldad said...

Columbo is available via streaming on Netflix.

Timothy Edwards said...

To add to what others have said: I have been surprised by Homeland (a couple of scenes through which we fast forward, but not many), complex morality, keeps one guessing.

Also, I don't know whether you have access to it on your side of the Atlantic, but the original (Danish) version of The Killing is excellent (and gets better each series). We have also enhoyed Borgen (again in Danish with English subtitles).

Robert said...

I like Inspector Lewis. It seems that the Masterpiece series are really well done. They are all slow to be released, though.

Robert said...

I would also add Law & Order Criminal Intent.

And I agree with all of the comments on Psych and Monk. They keep you laughing all the time as you follow the investigation. Monk is a bit more personal in looking at his struggles, while Psych is more quick-witted.

Barbara said...

Once Upon a Time. Fairy tale world meets (sort of) real world, with a young woman (daughter of Snow White and Prince Charming) who was saved from the Wicked Queen's curse on the land just in time, and sent to today's world -where she grew up in foster homes, had a child out of wedlock and gave him up for adoption (adopted by Regina, the Wicked Queen), and became a bail bonds-uh-*person*. All the rest live in a little town called StoryBrooke and have no memory of their "real" lives until the curse can be broken -only a few know the truth. Sheer genius of a show if you ask me. Season 1 is on Netflix, and Season 2 (which just had its last show for the winter) is on abc.com.

And there's always The Wonder Years!

The rest of the ones I would suggest have already been mentioned. :)

Barbara said...

Oh yeah, I should mention in Once Upon a Time - Emma, the daughter of the Prince and Snow White, is the prophesied Savior of the land, foreordained to come back and break the curse. Thought I should mention that. ;)

Marla said...

I think they have all nine seasons of Monk on Netflix (yes -- we totally love it!) How can you not love an OCD detective?? Stargage:SG1 is on Netflix now too. We have the seasons on DVD, but I think you would find it pretty entertaining,(and the evolution dribble is minimal -- usually just a few episodes here and there.)

Joey Phillips said...

Dan,

If you liked 24, you will love Homeland. The first few episodes (much like 24 actually) have objectionable dirty scenes. The first of which is hard to catch because it is deliberately sudden. Other than that it is absolutely the 2nd best show on TV.

The first, of course, is Dexter.

Si Hollett said...

Matt - Rev isn't very funny. The lead takes himself too seriously (but not in a Basil Fawlty/Father Ted way that's funny) and that, coupled with the hopelessness of his sincere, but liberal faith, brings a massive downer on the whole thing. Then again, I know a lot of people who love it - some are even fairly conservative in their faith. Don't think Dan will like it though - it will make him want to repeatedly throw copies of TWTG at the screen in the hope that some of the content gets through!

---

Homeland's most objectionable scenes are all in the first few episodes (though iffy morality and bad language keep on going) - can't help but think that it was to abuse the lax (compared to other US TV) pay-for cable censorship in order to get people watching: "hey, this person is topless in this episode - let's watch. Oh its really rather good, let's keep watching". Game of Thrones, etc seems to have kept its nudity - is that as the second thought about it being good isn't there?

---

Robert - British mystery stuff that PBS rebrands as part of its 'Masterpiece' programme - like Lewis, Taggart, Sherlock, A Touch of Frost, etc - will only have a tiny amount (typically 3) of feature-length episodes a year, especially after it gets established.

There's nothing wrong with this from a British perspective, where seasons are much shorter anyway and writers, producers and actors all have several irons in the fire.

Lewis and Taggart air only occasionally, often after some big TV event so there can be lots of plugging and people are informed. Sherlock season 2 aired weekly last January. ITV likes to air one-off 3-part dramas Sunday-Monday-Tuesday, and the BBC now do Torchwood as Sunday-through-Friday whole season done in a week.

Gary Benfold said...

Yep, I'd try Downton Abbey; didn't expect to like it, but do, enormously. I agree about Doc Martin, too - well worth a go if you like gentle drama. It's nothing like House though - which I found crude and offensive. There's also a series - just one made so far, and another about to air - called 'Death in Paradise' which my wife and I enjoyed. (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Death-Paradise-Series-1-DVD/dp/B005RVF5XE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1356120017&sr=8-1)
The reason Sherlock comes out so infrequently, by the way, is The Hobbit - Martin Wotsit has too much of his time taken up with that.

jmb said...

You didn't ask for movie recommendations, but I'd like to mention one that was released last year, called "Buck." It's a documentary about the horse trainer who was the model for the movie "The Horse Whisperer," but it's really about much more than that, and one of the best docs I've ever seen. Genuinely inspiring. Rated PG, probably for some discussion about his disturbing childhood.

Unknown said...

I'm surprised no one has mentioned White Collar yet. We have enjoyed watching those on Netflix.
Another one we like is Larkrise to Candleford.

NoLongerBlind said...

I'm not much of a boob-tube fan, but I'll second two previously mentioned shows that my wife and I both enjoy:
Bluebloods
Person of Interest
And, I'll add one surprisingly not mentioned - CSI NY

Merry CHRISTmas to all!

Carl C. said...

This discussion is quite the interesting case-study in how a melting pot of (presumably) Christians see made-for-TV media. My wife and I are also on the lookout for a new series so this has been helpful.

I'll put in my two cents for Blue Bloods and Falling Skies, the latter of which I'm much more energetically behind. Your penchant for sci-fi ought to be enough to get you hooked, and the moral/family themes as well as character development are enough to keep interest high.

By the way... I totally share your assessment of Touch. Tried it, couldn't handle it anymore though. Too much karma floatin around.

yankeegospelgirl said...

Dan, I'm somewhat surprised to see you recommend Sherlock. I would never recommend that show to a Christian audience. For one thing, the constant innuendo/banter about homosexuality grew very stale very quickly. I realize some people find it screamingly funny. I got tired of it. Speaking as someone who loved the original Sherlock Holmes stories for years, this is a terrible way to treat the material.

I will admit that Cumberbatch and Freeman are both superb actors and sometimes managed to buoy up the series by their mere presence together on screen. The humor, when it was clean, was sometimes hilarious. However, I couldn't escape a sense of cheapness surrounding the whole thing. The whole look of the thing was trying too hard to be "hip," "sexy," or what-have-you.

Content-wise, this insistence on hip-ness manifests itself most egregiously in Season 2. _A Scandal in Belgravia_. Need I say more? That whole episode was horrible beyond words. What they did to Irene Adler is disgusting and unconscionable.

And as for Moriarty, they turned him into a giggling gay psycho instead of preserving what made the original character such a grandly fearsome foe. This Moriarty is nothing less than pure junk.

The unaired pilot showed what the series could have been had they stuck with a more low-key approach that focused on substance versus style (bar the gay innuendo that was already in place even then.) I snipped out the innuendo and kept that pilot, because it was quite good. _The Blind Banker_ was also good because it was virtually free of innuendo and just let Cumberbatch & Sherlock work their magic. _The Great Game_ was also decent until Moriarty showed up. By Season 2 it had descended into trashiness/kitschiness.

The show was a guilty pleasure for me at its best moments, and it did introduce me to Cumberbatch and Freeman. But the makers' vision for the series was so cheap that the brilliance of its two leads could only buy time before it imploded on itself.

Okay, rant over. Suffice it to say... I'm just surprised to see you of all people recommending this show.

As for procedurals to check out right now, I do recommend _Person of Interest_. Prepare to put up with some irritatingly persistent political correctness, but content-wise it is quite clean bar some language and some frightening scenarios. Jim Caviezel and Michael Emerson are outstanding. However, I will say that Season 1 is better than Season 2. Already some of the magic is fading. But totally check it out anyway.

yankeegospelgirl said...

Dan, I'm somewhat surprised to see you recommend Sherlock. I would never recommend that show to a Christian audience. For one thing, the constant innuendo/banter about homosexuality grew very stale very quickly. I realize some people find it screamingly funny. I got tired of it. Speaking as someone who loved the original Sherlock Holmes stories for years, this is a terrible way to treat the material.

I will admit that Cumberbatch and Freeman are both superb actors and sometimes managed to buoy up the series by their mere presence together on screen. The humor, when it was clean, was sometimes hilarious. However, I couldn't escape a sense of cheapness surrounding the whole thing. The whole look of the thing was trying too hard to be "hip," "sexy," or what-have-you.

Content-wise, this insistence on hip-ness manifests itself most egregiously in Season 2. _A Scandal in Belgravia_. Need I say more? That whole episode was horrible beyond words. What they did to Irene Adler is disgusting and unconscionable.

And as for Moriarty, they turned him into a giggling gay psycho instead of preserving what made the original character such a grandly fearsome foe. This Moriarty is nothing less than pure junk.

The unaired pilot showed what the series could have been had they stuck with a more low-key approach that focused on substance versus style (bar the gay innuendo that was already in place even then.) I snipped out the innuendo and kept that pilot, because it was quite good. _The Blind Banker_ was also good because it was virtually free of innuendo and just let Cumberbatch & Sherlock work their magic. _The Great Game_ was also decent until Moriarty showed up. By Season 2 it had descended into trashiness/kitschiness.

The show was a guilty pleasure for me at its best moments, and it did introduce me to Cumberbatch and Freeman. But the makers' vision for the series was so cheap that the brilliance of its two leads could only buy time before it imploded on itself.

Okay, rant over. Suffice it to say... I'm just surprised to see you of all people recommending this show.

As for procedurals to check out right now, I do recommend _Person of Interest_. Prepare to put up with some irritatingly persistent political correctness, but content-wise it is quite clean bar some language and some frightening scenarios. Jim Caviezel and Michael Emerson are outstanding. However, I will say that Season 1 is better than Season 2. Already some of the magic is fading. But totally check it out anyway.

yankeegospelgirl said...

(Oops, I think I posted a comment twice. Sorry 'bout that.)

Ex N1hil0 said...

Damages.

Legal drama starring Glenn Close. A major law suit provides the backdrop for the real focus of the series: the behind-the scenes machinations and ethical quandries, and the consequences and effects they have on the personal lives of those involved.

Great seasons 1 & 2. OK season 3. Pretty good season 4.

greglong said...

Sorry I'm late to the party.

Here you go:

LOST....

...and Duck Dynasty.

You're welcome.

greglong said...

Sorry I'm late to the game.

Here you go:

LOST

and

Duck Dynasty.

You're welcome.

Logan Paschke said...

Sherlock is fantastic.

That's all.

Logan Paschke said...

Sherlock.