Saturday, April 16, 2011

Phil Johnson's experience: absolutely infuriating

I assume you know Phil Johnson. If not, welcome to Earth, we hope you enjoy your stay and please don't annihilate us.

I know Phil, and count him a dear friend. So when I step back and look at this bad and dangerous world, and then focus back in on the treatment Phil received at the hands of TSA thugs — not in Saudi Arabia or North Korea, but here, on American soil — I am very angry.

Then when you add in this CNN report on how the TSA doubles-down to punish free citizens' dissent... the needle goes well up into the "red" zone.

Bryan Preston is right. That isn't about terrorists. It doesn't target our enemies. It is about punishing dissent.

I know it's been said, I know it's clich√©, I know it no longer deserves the status of deep insight — but it's true:
The terrorists have scored limitless victories on our freedoms post-9/11 without firing one shot or spending one dime.
And we state-indoctrinated sheeple just roll over and take it. What do we do? Some of us occasionally have to travel by air. We haven't the time or money to drive or sail or bus or use the trains.

Or go back to Phil, or Lig Duncan, or Don Carson, or John Piper, or John MacArthur. Should those brothers and mentors just stop attending conferences more than 100 miles from their homes, because they don't want to be — or don't want their wives to be — felt up by blue-gloved goons? Is that where we're heading? "Sorry to decline your invitation to speak, but I've decided to keep my privates private."

Who could blame them?

I project myself forward to the coming trip to England (DV). My dear wife already had a totally gratuitous, infuriating experience in an airport a few years back in my absence. It may be a blessing of sorts that I wasn't there. Dead-serious: I might have an arrest-record today, if I had been there. I will tolerate things done (or said) to me that I will not tolerate said or done to my wife or children or, for that matter, my friends. So, as God is my witness, when I consider the prospect of some smug operative beginning to invade, harass, and handle her... I'm afraid I wouldn't make my appointment.

What can we do?

So we stand by and watch the state-sanctioned sexual abuse of our friends, our wives, our children, ourselves. What can we do?

These gropebots have the sanction of the State. Plus, if we tick them off, they can fine us up to $10,000.

Or arrest us.

Let me put it to you: Phil is not a private, unknown quantity. There is zero percent chance that he poses a threat to national security or anything the TSA is supposed to care about. Yet he is singled out for this sort of punishing sexual molestation. Do you feel safer now? As you tuck your children in tonight, are you comforted by the thought that folks like Phil (and housewives and children and your wife and grandmother) are being felt-up for no rational reason, with the State's smiling approval?

Something has got to change. You'd think one of our prominent political leaders would stand up and do something.

But that would require a clue and a spine. Which may be asking too much.

51 comments:

JG said...

Absolutely agree. When individual airports said they were going to try to investigate alternative security options apart from TSA, DHS said they would shut the airports down. It's insane. Now some states are taking up the cause (finally!) link so maybe change is on the horizon. But I'm not getting my hopes up yet.

In other news, after my last plane trip last year, I was so ticked off I wrote each of the airports I traveled through and told them I wouldn't use them until they contracted different security staff. 2 out of 3 wrote me back and said they understood, agreed, and were trying to do just that. The third, a border town where I now live, wrote and told me they forwarded my information to TSA, and sure enough, shortly after I got another email from TSA asking for all my personal information - name, address, travel history, everything. Needless to say, I didn't respond. I haven't flown since then, but I wouldn't be surprised if next time I do, I nearly miss a flight.

LeeC said...

Your issue has been duly noted. *Moves Dans file closer to the front*

DJP said...

LOL! Exactly!

Something got me on the White House's press release email list!

David said...

For the past three years God has blessed me with a job that requires no air travel. Vacations with my family are driving affairs.

I sympathize with people like you, Phil and others whose occupations demand flying rather than driving. Unfortunately, unless you charter an airplane, you have no choice but to submit to sexual assault in this 'free' nation of ours.

My solution to airborne terrorists is much simpler. Run everybody through a metal detector, wand them if necessary. Restrict the amount of fluids they can carry. And then give every willing adult who doesn't drink a hand-held Taser when they board.

Seriously, on a 737, there might be almost 100 people with Tasers sitting around the cabin. If anybody tries something, ZAP!!!

Personally, I'd rather fly knowing I could get accidentally zapped with 50,000 volts than to watch one of my daughters get the treatment that Phil got. Like you, Dan, I'd probably go directly to jail.

Word verification: pecoma, which everybody knows is an anagram for moecap.

Sharon said...

The last time I flew was in 1999. After 9/11/01 I decided it would take something fairly critical before I boarded an airplane. And now . . . well, I'm just not going to do it. My job doesn't require it (thankfully!), my family lives in the same state, and my yearly vacations consist of a very relaxing, unhurried and pleasant cross-country trip on Amtrak. I will not be prodded, groped, and unfairly targeted by . . . by . . . well, insert your own word here. Indeed, the terrorists have won.

Douglas said...

>You'd think one of our prominent political leaders would stand up and do something.

They have done something. They make sure THEY don't have to be sexually molested.

http://thecaucus.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/11/19/no-security-pat-downs-for-boehner/

DJP said...

Groan

The rant/post was already long enough, or I'd've added my thought that Dear Leader could validate his approval of this process by posting weekly videos of him, Michelle, and his two daughters being hands-in-the-pants/all-over felt up by TSA goons.

But of course freedom isn't for the little people.

It would be interesting to see a poll of this question: who poses a greater threat to national security — Barack Obama or Phil Johnson?

Unless the emerg*s tilted the numbers, of course.

candy said...

Unfortunately our rants fall on deaf ears. TSA will continue this practice and people will get used to it. The government works in increments, and the abuses are accelerating. I am amazed the things our President and others get away with almost daily. It can be depressing at times. I keep reminding myself that God is sovereignly in control.

Phil Johnson said...

Good one. But now your case-file is flagged, and you're sure to get the <air quotes>ENHANCED PAT DOWN</air quotes> next time.

Sharon said...

Thank you, Candy, for the reminder of God's absolute sovereignty in our lives. It's one of the most precious promises in Scripture. And all this just means we are ever closer to the Lord's return for His Church!

Scooter said...

I travel rather extensively for my job, and I've never once gotten the invasive patdown. But good night, this is the solution our government has come up with to deal with terrorism? Why do we functionally reinvent the wheel every time there's a tiny chance of a threat?

I can't complain that somewhere, somehow, someone might get through. This is very fallen world, and wicked men and women do succeed in their plans. But what makes me mad is that we cobble together some lame response to a threat that treats our own citizens as suspects and then force all our airports to use the swiss cheese security procedures (per JG's link).

Dan, didn't you post an article about how Israel does their airport security? A bit costly, but it really works.

"Indeed, the immigration agent who refused to let the alleged "20th hijacker" into the United States in 2001 later testified that the man's arrogant behavior contributed to his suspicions."

Hmm, I wonder how the other 19 got onboard the airplanes?

Sir Brass said...

I think the next thing to be added to the "axe list" in Paul Ryan's budget is the TSA ;).

John said...

"Mad" or "angry" or "furious" or "raving lunatic fury" doesn't come close to describing my emotions in response to this issue.

I suggest lots of prayer and fasting prior to travel plans in September...

...I have an idea of the love you have for certain carbon based units that will be with you.

John said...

If everyone refused to fly for one business day unless the procedures changed...I think the capitalists would take note.

GrammaMack said...

Oh dear. I'm flying out of a small U.S. airport in a week to visit with our newest grandbabe (born Thursday night, and a girl, after 3 sons and 4 grandsons, woo hoo!) and her family, and I'm so hoping to avoid this kind of thing. Is it less likely at a smaller airport?

Mrs. Bones said...

These days, being a hermit doesn't seem like such a bad thing. :) I've been blessed to have never been aboard an airplane.

What makes me go O.o with the whole government-sanctioned-molestation-in-the-name-of-security thing is the tired, worn-out "If you don't have anything to hide, you shouldn't have a problem with it." statement made by a lot of people who should know better.

What if I *don't* have anything to hide, yet I *do* have a problem with someone other than my husband or my doctor putting their hands on me? Why is it that those of us who'd rather mind our own business and be left alone are viewed with suspicion? I guess that makes me unpatriotic, or a Bad American (TM). So be it.

God is in control, and although we may not see the big picture, He knows what He's doing. That is very comforting to me in these times.

You're right about one thing, the terrorists have won (for now, temporally). But we all know who really wins in the end. :)

Come, Lord Jesus!

Megan

candy said...

Remember that many people made a LOT of money from the development of the recent scanners by the private company who got the contract, Rapiscan. One promoter and recipient of profits from the scanners was Michael Chertoff, former head of Homeland Security. "They" (ominous music) want you to be uncomfortable, VERY uncomfortable doing the alternate pat down procedure. Only one of many invasive methods being implemented in our lives. Check out news reports of the thermal infrared cameras that went all around Boston checking for energy leaks in houses, and able to incidentally see the heat of human activity in houses too.

Rachael Starke said...

I'd say it's unbelievable, but..

I recently took two plane trips - one with my ten y.o. daughter, and then just this week to TGC in Chicago. In both cases, my primary strategy was prayer - first for freedom from molestation (especially for my daughter), and then, for clarity of conviction on what to do if I/we got pegged. Going with my daughter out of San Jose, they had all the scanners etc. But a female TSA agent and I exchanged a look, and she very obviously directed us through the ordinary scanner with zero fanfare. On the way back, we won the search lottery for our stuff (thanks to a sinister snow globe), but again, they took one look at my girl and waved us through the ordinary scans. I'm convinced God was in that.

The experience out of Chicago on my own was also uneventful. But a woman behind me got pegged for the full assault. She was sort of giggling nervously, but I honestly had to turn my head away in embarrassment. And I would have talked to her about it afterwards, to ask why she submitted, but she disappeared.

I think until some of us are prayerfully willing to incur real cost and real inconvenience, and God opens a door, this will continue, and get worse. We need to make contracts with our families, companies and organizations (like conferences) that states that if it happens, we won't submit, and we'll collectively sacrifice our schedules and wallets accordingly.

Jeff said...

It is a shame that they (TSA/ Government) refuse to "profile" the exact demographic of the known terrorists of the past 20 years or so - 20-40 year old Middle Eastern descent males. Instead they want to subject kids, grandmothers, wives, daughters, Americans to this violation of privacy in the name of freedom. The USA is the laughing stock of the world because we let our government molest with "enhanced pat downs" and look at our naked bodies with the xrated scanners.

Just get ready for these procedures to be put in effect at all government facilities. Need to buy stamps? Need to pay your vehicle taxes? Have jury duty? Get prepared to be violated - sit down, shut up, get groped and smile.

Jeff said...

It is a shame that they (TSA/ Government) refuse to "profile" the exact demographic of the known terrorists of the past 20 years or so - 20-40 year old Middle Eastern descent males. Instead they want to subject kids, grandmothers, wives, daughters, Americans to this violation of privacy in the name of freedom. The USA is the laughing stock of the world because we let our government molest with "enhanced pat downs" and look at our naked bodies with the xrated scanners.

Just get ready for these procedures to be put in effect at all government facilities. Need to buy stamps? Need to pay your vehicle taxes? Have jury duty? Get prepared to be violated - sit down, shut up, get groped and smile.

MJ said...

Full disclosure first. I have a tendency to be a bit cynical and paranoid so take that on board. However, I am firmly convinced that this is being done to train Americans to be compliant to the State. Americans are not by nature compliant so to bring about the Marxist/Socialist haven they so clearly desire, we have to be retrained. It's just the beginning, folks. This is not about terrorism - not for one minute - and hasn't been since Jan. 2009. Fortunately, there are still people protesting and getting out the videos of these outrages. "Just because you're not paranoid doesn't mean they're not out to get you."

DJP said...

I think that is at least possible, MJ. In the name of national security, hundreds of free American citizens are counting nothing sacred from government hands, enduring humiliation and violation.

I go you one better. A century ago, an American might have read of the reign of the Beast in Revelation, and said "Not in America. No American knee would bow to that kind of all-controlling tyranny."

Could anyone say that now?

DJP said...

My DAOD, still not in possession of a Google account, contributes this:

1. You could always try the "These aren't the droids you're looking for" tactic.... — like "You don't need to give a pat-down. You see everything you want to see. Move along, now, move along!"

2. More seriously, she offers this for Gramma Mack--

List of scanner airports.

She got pegged at CVG.

/c:

Lynda O said...

So if you fly out of one of the smaller airports that doesn't have the scanners, do they do the hands-on grope anyway, or just the old way for those who set-off the metal detectors?

We don't fly or travel far away very often, but in a few weeks will be taking a trip of 1100 miles -- driving it in two days each way this time. Agree that the current situation is ridiculous, and it's very sad to see that the majority of Americans are complying with this police-state and don't object to what's going on.

DJP said...

I reiterate what I've said many times:

If you could resuscitate a Founding Father and show him how we live, his first words would be "When were we conquered, and by whom?"

CR said...

How disgusting! This post gives me pause and here I think are some lessons learned if I have to go through with it.

(1)Use the backscatter machine. (2) consider being searched by a female TSA. I don't want to be groped, but more so, I don't want to be groped by a man. My understanding is that they ask you by what gender you wanna be searched by. (3) Asked to be publicly stripped search. They're less apt to do something nasty in public. If they want to strip me down to my underwear for the whole world to see, be my guest. There is no such thing as privacy since smart phones were developed.

Sharon said...

@Lynda (and others) Is taking Amtrak an option? It's really a pleasant way ro travel. And not a TSA agent in sight!

WV: mantorn

Not goin' there!

Sir Aaron said...

You already know this and have said it, but it's another illustration of the fact that elections have consequences. And frankly, man's natural inclination is not for freedom but for tyranny. Do you have to look farther than OT Israel? "We would have been better in Egypt!"

As for some friendly advice from a government employee that may help avoid getting screened. #1) smile and have a pleasant attitude. Say please, thank you, and have a nice day. TSA inspectors are people and a little honey can go a long way. #2) Get your stuff together. Be organized and make sure you have everything off so you don't set off the metal detector. #3) If you have kids, bring your stroller. They want to move you through and that thing is going to hold up the line. #4) If you get pat down, evangelize. The most effective way to get rid of pesky people is to tell them about Christ. Think about it, while they have you for 45 minutes you also have 45 minutes to talk about the gospel. I know that isn't the main reason why you should be evangelizing, but....sometimes it has its benefits. And you never know. You might win somebody to Christ.

Mike Westfall said...

Learned a lot from Mike Farris at the home school convention this weekend. We Americans are already well trained to accept tyranny. Congress doesn't even write laws any more in many cases, but just passes the buck to unelected heads of administrative departments. Obamacare is a prime example. The policies of the TSA are another.
According to Article 1, section 1 of the constitution, "All legislative Powers ... shall be vested in a Congress..."
Nothing in the Constitution allows the Congress to delegate law-making to the President's administrative departments. Their job is to , um... administrate the laws Congress passes, not make them.

So, TSA telling us we can't do, what we must do, what we must submit to, is a violation of the very first sentence of the Constitution (minus the preamble, that is), nevermind the 4th amendment.

Mike Westfall said...

Learned a lot from Mike Farris at the home school convention this weekend. We Americans are already well trained to accept tyranny. Congress doesn't even write laws any more in many cases, but just passes the buck to unelected heads of administrative departments. Obamacare is a prime example. The policies of the TSA are another.
According to Article 1, section 1 of the constitution, "All legislative Powers ... shall be vested in a Congress..."
Nothing in the Constitution allows the Congress to delegate law-making to the President's administrative departments. Their job is to , um... administrate the laws Congress passes, not make them.

So, TSA telling us we can't do, what we must do, what we must submit to, is a violation of the very first sentence of the Constitution (minus the preamble, that is), nevermind the 4th amendment.

Gilbert said...

Sharon,

Word is that Amtrak and train travel will be next...followed by Greyhound (bus).

Solameanie said...

I honestly don't see much change until Congress — which has the authority to impose a change — personally feels the collective wrath of the citizenry. Some of that wrath needs to be carried into the next election when the would-be "Commanders in Chief" experience it at full-throated roar.

And no, I am not talking about violence and do not want that to happen. However, I imagine that's where it's eventually going to end up, with TSA workers getting mobbed and punched out by people who have had a gut-full. And our elected leaders being unresponsive will virtually guarantee that to happen, unless we have indeed become Orwellian sheep and proles.

Susan said...

All right...here's my corrupted fleshly side talking:

What if somebody out there sued the inane TSA for emotional duress? Would that work? I mean, there's got to be some big-shot lawyer out there dying for a challenge to bring down infuriating bureaucracy....

Susan said...

(And Rachael, I'm so thankful that the Lord protected you and your daughter from such invasion. Gives me hope to pray.)

Susan said...

All right, folks, be further infuriated like I: I just went to the ACLJ website and here's what they had to say about TSA job applicants.

Sadly, it seems to make Phil's odious experience with them more understandable. >:(

Kevin said...

Everyone should call their congressman and ask them to support the "American Traveler Dignity Act" (HR 6416) that Ron Paul has introduced. Here is his speech on the House floor:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iDDslRO5J8o

Here is the FULL text (no 1,000 page bill here):

SECTION 1. NO IMMUNITY FOR CERTAIN AIRPORT SCREENING METHODS.

No law of the United States shall be construed to confer any immunity for a Federal employee or agency or any individual or entity that receives Federal funds, who subjects an individual to any physical contact (including contact with any clothing the individual is wearing), x-rays, or millimeter waves, or aids in the creation of or views a representation of any part of a individual's body covered by clothing as a condition for such individual to be in an airport or to fly in an aircraft. The preceding sentence shall apply even if the individual or the individual's parent, guardian, or any other individual gives consent.

Rachael Starke said...

Susan, I am too. I was thinking specifically of Daniel, when he and his friends had been newly captured by the Babylonians, and Esther, as she was considering going to King Ahasuerus. In both cases, they saw themselves as in a specific place for God's purpose, and they put themselves at risk for the sake of justice for God's people (Esther) and obedience to God's law (Daniel). The common thread in both stories is that God both puts them in that position, and God grants them supernatural favor when they put their faith in action. By extension, Jesus did the very same thing - put his life on the line to obtain justice for HIs people and obey the law on their behalf. Unlike Esther and Daniel, Jesus was indeed obedient to death, and in doing so did obtain justice for His people.

We need to prayerfully consider what we'd be willing to sacrifice (time, money, etc.) in advance, then pray that God give us grace if and when we find ourselves in that spot. To be honest, had what happened to Phil begun to happen to me, you would have seen me getting pretty Peter and Paul in Acts over the whole thing (loud prophesying and appealing to the rights of my citizenship). I would not have let it go on. And I would have willingly gone to jail, and then to the media. In my case, God very obviously said no. But to someone else, He might say yes.

The government is getting away with this because too many people care too much about their destination, their job, their wallet, etc.

Sharon said...

@Rachael There is a big difference between TSA actions and Daniel's actions. With Daniel and Esther it was a righteousness issue (civil law forbidding what God has explicitly told you to do. Flying is not a God-commanded action, so we are not instructed by the Scriptures to disobey the law in this case. And there are alternative choices. I'm just sayin'.

DJP said...

Solameanie — let me make sure I have you right.

1. You do not advocate violence; in fact

2. You are absolutely opposed to violence in this case; however

3. You are simply expressing as an observer that your fear that pagan, non-Christian folks will reach the boiling point and will erupt in violence if these invasions continues unabated?

Because to make my position clear, I oppose violence as a response to this. I don't know the way forward if legislators/political leaders won't act, or if this doesn't move Obama's replacement by someone who will immediate re-aim our efforts radically.

To that end, I think I've understood you correctly. If not,correct me, and I'll remove the comment, because I won't host such suggestions.

Solameanie said...

Dan,

Yes, you are understanding me correctly. Sorry for the lack of clarity, and on re-reading my earlier remark, I can understand how my comment could have been construed otherwise, especially the part about "proles" and "sheep." I am not advocating violence in response to this situation, and believe it would be unbiblical to respond in that fashion, unless something was being done to physically harm a child or family member. The wrath I am talking about should be expressed verbally (albeit righteously), and in the ballot box.

HSAT, I do often struggle from a theological perspective on the question of where and when it is permissible to engage in a physical response. There are those who believe the American Revolutionary War was unbiblical rebellion. The other side will argue that Romans 13 contains a reverse logic, i.e. when government begins being a terror to the righteous and ceases being a terror to evildoers, it is no longer a legitimate government and can be resisted.

Contrast that with the example of our brothers and sisters in Russia during the communist years, who willingly went like lambs to the slaughter. That's not in the American DNA, but was their response more pleasing to the Lord and glorifying to God? It really is a difficult question. By the time it is necessary to put the question to the test, I am hoping and praying I will not be here.

Lynda O said...

As far as comparing Daniel and Esther vs. TSA: actually Esther's case doesn't really apply, as she had already violated a few of the Jewish laws before she reached the point of going to the king without invitation. Daniel was forced into his situation, not exactly the same as American's travel options.

However, I do see the similarity between our constitutional rights as citizens, and Paul's actions as in Acts 16 and 22 -- he had the right as a citizen to not submit to the beatings, and sometimes he invoked that legal right. Even so, he still experienced some of the persecution, such as being confined in the first place, and receiving the beatings in Acts 16 before they let him go.

Re Amtrak: yeah, I think I would have liked to travel that way if the decision were mine... but the person I'm traveling with is like most Americans and doesn't understand what the big deal is -- and just thinks that we (here on this blog) are weird. My choice was either airline or driving, and so now I'm especially praying for physical endurance to do all that driving. But from the news about Amtrak and that incident in Georgia, it sounds like Amtrak will not always be a TSA-free place either.

Merrilee Stevenson said...

I'm thankful, and at the same time grieved, by the recent events, because it has helped us decide about our summer plans. I was considering traveling from PA to OR this summer with my 4 kids while my husband travels for work. Some of my family members haven't even met my youngest two (who are 4 and 2), and we were really looking forward to going. But after a tearful discussion with my husband, we came to the conclusion that we cannot afford to purchase 5 tickets and then not fly if we were selected. It's a rather expensive game of roulette. I might feel somewhat differently if my kids were old enough to decide for themselves if they wanted to undergo the scrutiny or not, but they are too young. So instead we plan to save the money we would have spent, and purchase a "new" van for us to travel there next summer, Lord willing.

However, I also e-mailed my senator and state representative to ask what they are doing about it, and I plan to contact the airlines to inform them of the business they are losing because of the TSA's practices. My hope is that there will be some changes, but even so, I don't imagine the changes will happen quickly.

I'm really curious if there has been a noticeable increase in Amtrack ticket sales and decline in airlines ticket sales since the TSA has started implementing this. Considering the number of bombings on trains in other countries, it seems only a matter of time before TSA goes there, too. We did consider taking Amtrak, but it's just not affordable for us to travel so far.

I don't consider myself a political activist, but I do think I should let my elected officials hear from me, and the airlines need to know why they are losing my money, so they might get involved in a solution as well.

Merrilee Stevenson said...

I'm thankful, and at the same time grieved, by the recent events, because it has helped us decide about our summer plans. I was considering traveling from PA to OR this summer with my 4 kids while my husband travels for work. Some of my family members haven't even met my youngest two (who are 4 and 2), and we were really looking forward to going. But after a tearful discussion with my husband, we came to the conclusion that we cannot afford to purchase 5 tickets and then not fly if we were selected. It's a rather expensive game of roulette. I might feel somewhat differently if my kids were old enough to decide for themselves if they wanted to undergo the scrutiny or not, but they are too young. So instead we plan to save the money we would have spent, and purchase a "new" van for us to travel there next summer, Lord willing.

However, I also e-mailed my senator and state representative to ask what they are doing about it, and I plan to contact the airlines to inform them of the business they are losing because of the TSA's practices. My hope is that there will be some changes, but even so, I don't imagine the changes will happen quickly.

I'm really curious if there has been a noticeable increase in Amtrack ticket sales and decline in airlines ticket sales since the TSA has started implementing this. Considering the number of bombings on trains in other countries, it seems only a matter of time before TSA goes there, too. We did consider taking Amtrak, but it's just not affordable for us to travel so far.

I don't consider myself a political activist, but I do think I should let my elected officials hear from me, and the airlines need to know why they are losing my money, so they might get involved in a solution as well.

(I apologize if this is a re-post. I'm Having "issues".)

GrammaMack said...

Thanks to your dear and only daughter for that list. The airports I'm flying out of both ways do not have full-body scanners--good to know. Thanks also to Rachael for the reminder that prayer and preparation is the way to go. As a non-USian grandmother who just wants to get to her kids and grandkids, I'll endure whatever humiliation I'm forced to endure, but I'm praying that I'll be protected from it.

Paula said...

I saw several news reports this weekend about a six-year-old girl who was groped and drug tested by an enthusiastic TSA agent. The woman went up and down both legs and stuck her hand in her pants. Somehow the parents managed to get it on video.

The mother, among other things, asked how she was supposed to teach her child about appropriate boundaries with strangers touching her body when such groping is becoming commonplace in our lives.

DJP, your quote about the founders is right on.

DJP said...

Yes ma'am. I went on and on about that very incident in last Friday's HT.

beachbirdie said...

My husband flies every week for work and travels to larger cities. He usually spends many months traveling to the same city until his projects are done.

He has been singled out for body-scans and scrutiny 8 out of the last 12 weeks. His cheerful attitude has not helped him one bit.

Someone tell me what we are supposed to do? There is no work near home that he can do, and we cannot afford to move.

I am beyond frustrated, and like Phil, seeing red at this point.

Paula said...

Argh....caught in the act of merely skimming Friday's H & T : ( My apologies...we are in the throes of baseball season here with 4-5 games a week. Grueling.

@ Beach Birdie...you might consider contacting your congressman. If enough of these folks keep hearing complaints from constituents, maybe they'll start to respond. This is an issue that upsets people on both sides.

I think sending complaints like Phil's - loads and loads of them - to members of Congress could make a difference. People complaining to TSA should be encouraged to CC their Congressman and Senators.

threegirldad said...

These gropebots have the sanction of the State. Plus, if we tick them off, they can fine us up to $10,000.

Or arrest us.


When the Ministry of Truth fails to convince, the Ministry of Love isn't far behind...

Sir Aaron said...

@Lynda O: I think a lot of people fall into Carlo's position that the backscatter machines aren't a big deal and don't feel they offer a detailed enough view to be objectionable. Many don't know that some places give objectionable searches to 4 year olds. I think a lot of people are just ill-informed about the situation and about government bureacracy in general.

@beachbirdie: I didn't say it would be a cure-all, but in a border line case it might make all the difference.

@merrilee: I'm so sorry about your plans. I hope they work out next year. Incidentally, I don't think that financial incentives mean much to liberals. First, they don't like profit. Second, if you read their propaganda such as rules for radicals, they want us not to be mobile. They want us not to travel. They can control us better that way. Seriously...read $20 Per Gallon gas or Rules for Radicals. At some point Christians and other conservatives are going to have to make a choice. Submit or go with Stan's suggestion.

Merrilee Stevenson said...

@ beach birdie, the news story about the 3-year old who was videotaped kicking and screaming (back in Nov./Dec.) did have a suggestion your husband might try. The reporter said that each boarding pass has a number code, and if you have been pre-selected for an "enhanced" search, the code will be there. He said you can call the airlines and ask to have the code removed. (If your husband tries it and it works, please come back and let us know!) I'm still sceptical.