Thursday, November 03, 2011

Homeopathic emergency room

At least one part of humor per million:

18 comments:

Steve Berven said...

Hilarious, and spot-on. Sad, too. My sister died at 37, partly because, I think, she distrusted "traditional" medicine and spent way too much time investigating homeopathic remedies instead of actually getting treated.

There's probably some benefits to overall health, but not when you need serious medical diagnostics.

BTW, just Kindled up "The World Tilting Gospel." Gonna start it tonight!

Robert said...

Hilarious...I went through a few of the others, too. Outside of some foul language, those were great, too. I liked the animal rights hypocrisy and vegan ones a lot. Those guys are funny.

DJP said...

Sorry to hear about your sister, Steve.

I certainly don't unalterably oppose "alternative" medicine, but one does have to be cautious. Of course, desperate situations lead one to desperate measures.

A friend going through medical school said there were some osteopaths in (as I recall, this was decades ago) their rotations. He said they seemed like nice fellows, but were always well behind the curve.

Thanks for reading WTG; I hope it's a blessing to you.

Steve Talas said...

Hilarious! I have to say that in some churches here in the UK homoeopathy verges on almost having a cult like following. If folks want to stick a sprig of parsley between their toes in the belief in cures everything from corns to cancer I wish them all the best, just pass me the drugs!

Fred Butler said...

I do believe that is the dynamic duo who brought us Angel Summoner and the BMX Bandit

mikeb said...

Modern medicine does great with emergency care, i.e. sowing on body parts, closing up wounds, etc. But they do a poor job of dealing with chronic disease due to the medicate until death approach.

Natural medicine does a great job of helping the body overcome chronic diseases, but obviously falls short of wound/emergency care.

Funny video, yes. But let us not create a categorical fallacy from it.

Sir Brass said...

My general physician practices both homeopathic and traditional medicine. Now, thanks to big pharma effecitvely convincing insurers that homeopathic treatments are "quack", almost NO insurance will EVER touch covering homeopathic treatments, and thus they're expensive as I have to pay for all of THAT out of pocket. Still, every time I've gotten sick, under my doctor's care, with a combination of traditional treatments and homeopathic treatments, I've always gotten better within a week's time of going under his care. That includes when I caught pneumonia. I was up and at-'em within a week's time.

There's much to be said for homeopathic medicine, but it needs to be a balanced approach. Like homeopathic medicine itself, it's all about the balance.

Steven A Mitchell said...

LOVE That Mitchell and Webb Look! Great sketch!

Herding Grasshoppers said...

HA HA HA!

"When someone comes in with... well, just more money than sense... you're there."

Sadly, too true in far too many situations. Or maybe that's just here, with all the leftover hippies.

Example?

Roll a quartz crystal around in your armpit for deodorant, do you?

It's not working.

Seth said...

Obamacare?

Fred Butler said...

On the viability of homeopathic medicine. I knew a dear saint who was diagnosed with cancer. She was afraid of chemo and radiation treatment, being convinced by a group of muddle headed religious psuedo-spiritual types she knew that God intended men to eat good, God honoring foods (which they alone were certain made the list) and use homeopathic, natural cures. One person boasted that it will reverse any cancer.

Regrettably, she spent thousands upon thousands of dollars and died with in a year or so.

I don't discount all of this stuff. I am sure there is a "balance." Heck, at the risk of receiving a severe wedgie from any homeschool mothers, I imagine there may be some medicinal value with cannabis. But it probably comes down to how these treatments are administered and what specific diseases are being cured.

Herding Grasshoppers said...

I find myself immediately distrustful of the whole homeopathic/holistic "medicine" because virtually everyone I come across who advocates or practices it is entangled in creepy "spiritual" practices, ie New Age and/or Eastern mysticism.

No thanks.

And no wedgie for Fred, but a doubtful, one-eyebrow-up glare ;D

Sir Aaron said...

Most homeopathic remedies have zero scientific evidence that they work. None. Zero. Can't be repeated, can't be reproduced, can't be shown to do anything.

Susan said...

I was going to ask whether homeopathy includes traditional Chinese medicine, but Wikipedia distinguishes between the two. I can tell you examples of Chinese medicine working wonders in my family members' lives (but of course you'll have to find the right doctors and get herbs of the highest quality possible). As for homeopathy according to Wikipedia...thanks, but no. thanks

(And should yours truly ever need to take out an appendix on the verge of rupturing, you will not find her passing "GO" or collecting $200--you'll find her in to emergency room.) :)

Andy Dollahite said...

Dan, as to your comment at 4:43, my experience is that osteopaths today are much closer to allopaths than they are to homeopaths. Some of the best surgeons I know at LAC+USC are DOs. Definitely important differences still.

Susan said...

Oops, that's in "the" emergency room.

Rita Tomassetti said...

ok that was terribly hilarious! But it's not far from reality, in my country dominicans are know for self-medication and home remedies, lucky charms and all that...and its really sad. During my pediatrics rotation I saw the first baby die bc of negligence of the parent. The brought the baby when it was too late, and when the nurses removed the mattress to clean it, they found voodoo(witchcraft) stuff underneath it. I was heartbroken.

SolaMommy said...

Herding:"I find myself immediately distrustful of the whole homeopathic/holistic "medicine" because virtually everyone I come across who advocates or practices it is entangled in creepy "spiritual" practices, ie New Age and/or Eastern mysticism."

Agreed.