Thursday, March 17, 2011

St. Patrick's Day: a contrarian note we need to note

Dr. Russell D. Moore tells us the lesser-known and vastly more important (and true) side of the life of Patrick of Ireland. (h-t Chris Brauns)

But yes, I'm wearing the only green item of clothing I possess.

20 comments:

Paula said...

That's interesting. I guess because I grew up in a heavily Catholic area with a Slovak Pentecostal grandmother who would literally hiss the word "Catholic" because it was it was so evil in her sight, I've always balked at the "Saint" in St. Patrick and never stopped to consider that the Catholics might have misappropriated him. Very.Long. Run-on. Sentence.

I love the internet for just this reason.

Sir Aaron said...

Paula:

Good comment. I always had similar reaction...guy is a Catholic hero so he probably wasn't even Christian. Horrible sentiment and I'm happy to now be corrected.

But I do enjoy corned beef and cabbage so we have that today! Not much of a green beer guy though.

Rachael Starke said...

What I don't understand it: how could such a noble saint (small s ;) ) be commemorated with such horrible food. We're going to a dinner with some of my Phil's work people, and only for the sake of the gospel will I not be sneaking in a Tupperware container inside my purse. Perhaps we're recreating what brother Patrick himself had to eat for the sake of being "missional"?

Wendy said...

Rachel,
That is hysterical.

Paula said...

Oh Rachael, perhaps you've never had the exquisite pleasure of these exquisite noms!!

Stefan said...

Being of partially Scots Irish descent, I've never felt a terribly strong urge to wear green on this day. I wouldn't dare wear orange, however.

Anyhow, it was excellent to learn about the real man, his real life, and be reminded of the God whom he served.

Wendy said...

Paula,
Is that corned beef on rye? If so, it would be truly exquisite is you replace 80% of the beef with sauerkraut :)

Paula said...

Wendy - it's an exquisite reuben...look closely at the bottom and you'll see the sauerkraut and also note the melty Swiss cheese goodness on top, along with the grilled rye.

Kim said...

Tomie dePaola has written a children's book "Patrick, Patron Saint of Ireland", that I feel comfortable reading to young children at our Christian school. It presents a historical Patrick being converted while a slave and being called in a vision to bring God to the people of Ireland. A good starting place for kids who think March 17 is all about wearing green.

CR said...

Dan - would the only green you wear be a stack of bills in your wallet. I heard about some tradition that the Protestants started wearing orange. Got any orange?

Rachael - you don't like corn beef? That's just wrong!

DJP said...

I wore a green shirt and ate an orange (tangerine). Does that make me an ecumenical event?

Merrilee Stevenson said...

The book review makes me want to read it.

Rachael: should have worn the dress with the casserole warmer.

Stephan, what is the message that is sent when someone wears orange on St. Patrick's day? I live in a heavily Catholic area, and many in our little community know we' re Protestant. In your opinion, could it damage one's gospel-effectiveness?

Stefan said...

Merrilee:

Sorry, I was being cheeky and irreverent. I was only trying to make a lame joke about it because I've never been big on the whole wearing-green thing.

That being said, while I am not well versed in these matters, I suppose it could damage one's Gospel effectiveness.

The symbolism of wearing orange might be lost on many people (especially the "Irish for a day" types, I suppose)—and some might just not care—but for others, I'd venture to guess that it might be needlessly provocative, as it is the emblematic colour of the Protestants in Northern Ireland.

Thomas Louw said...

I’m not Irish but my Irish friends call me a Dutchmen. (It used to be a insult English speaking people threw at Boers) I wear protestant orange with pride and I do eat corned meat yummy.

RT said...

Merrilee:

The Protestants of Northern Ireland wear orange, not typically on St Patrick's Day but rather on July 12, to commemorate the victory of William of Orange (William III of England) on that day over the Catholic forces of James II at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690.

Sir Aaron said...

What horrible food,Rachael?

@Merrilee: I doubt anybody would understand what the orange meant these days. As for the message, it's always been my personal opinion that you don't effectively minister by riling somebody up first. It's the same thing I've been saying about the Repent America folks. My opinion...anyways.

Merrilee Stevenson said...

Thanks for all the feedback everyone. I think in the future I'll just stick to "earth tones" on St. Patrick's day, instead of hot pink and orange. (Oh. Yes.) If that is anything on the lines of being similar to Repent America shenanigans, count me out. Ugh.

(I posted an earlier comment, but not sure if it got through. If this is a repeat, just delete the "lesser one" please.)

Stefan said...

Hot pink and orange!?

Might as well go for a headband, hoop earrings, and leg warmers while you're at it.

Then you can "contextualize" to the "lost in the '80s" crowd.

:)

Merrilee Stevenson said...

(-:

I nearly choked on my cereal reading that last comment!

For clarification: my daughter and I were wearing pink, and my 2-year-old son was in the orange.

Not that it really matters. (sigh) My neighbors must think I' m a freak. Or just "frea-kaay." ;-)

Susan said...

Well, down here in SoCal, one of the streets by my work place was blocked off, and they had a band play U2 songs from morning till afternoon. The local deli offered coupons that slashed $2 off their ginormous corned beef sandwich, and I went to a nearby Starbucks to get a "venti shaken iced green tea with apple juice and matcha [super-green Japanese green tea] powder". Granted, I didn't really get the drink for St. Patrick's, but it definitely fit the occasion. :)